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Filters: First Letter Of Title is S and Author is Miles, M  [Clear All Filters]
Miles, M.  2006.  Signs of Development in Deaf South & South-West Asia: histories, cultural identities, resistance to cultural imperialism.
First published in 2001, this revised article extended and updated 2006-04 offers evidence and hypotheses for a short cultural history of deaf people, culture and sign language in South Asia and South West Asia, using documents from antiquity through 2005. A new appendix shows 110 items on deafness and sign language in the Arab countries of the Eastern Mediterranean and South West Asia. This is a further revised, extended and updated version of a chapter first published in: Alison Callaway (ed) Deafness and Development, University of Bristol, Centre for Deaf Studies, 2001. It is here republished with kind permission. Internet publication URL:
Miles, M.  2006.  Social Responses to Disability & Poverty in Economically Weaker Countries. Research, Trends, Critique, and Lessons Usually Not Learnt. Annotated bibliography of modern and historical material.
The author introduces 250 articles and books showing social responses to disability and poverty in two-thirds of the world now and in history, with critical notes. He commends some intelligent approaches in the face of complexity and challenges simplistic slogans and official blah-blah. [An earlier version of the “Modern Materials” section first appeared in DisabilityWorld (Dec.05 - Jan.06), and is reproduced by kind permission, with revision and extension.] Internet publication URL:
Miles, M.  2003.  Segregated We Stand? The Mutilated Greeks' Debate at Persepolis, 330 BC
Probably the world's earliest recorded policy debate among a large group ofdisabled people. Also the first time a ruler changed his mind in response towhat they actually asked for. First published in Disability & Society 18 (7):865-79. Reproduced with permission of Carfax Publishing, Taylor & Francis,and with some revision. Internet publication URL:
Miles, M.  2000.  Signing in the Seraglio: mutes, dwarfs and jestures at the Ottoman Court 1500 - 1700.
Deaf people, known as 'mutes', worked in the Turkish Ottoman court from the fifteenth to the twentieth century in various roles along with dwarfs and other entertainers. Their signing system became popular, was used regularly by hearing people including successive Sultans, and was reportedly capable of expressing ideas of whatever complexity. Internet publication URL: