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2010
Miles, M.  2010.  THE CHUAS OF SHAH DAULAH AT GUJRAT, PAKISTAN: Evidence, Historical Background and Development, with Bibliography 1839-2009.
[This article cites and quotes historical materials first collected in: M. Miles (1996) Pakistan's microcephalic chuas of Shah Daulah: cursed, clamped or cherished? History of Psychiatry 7: 571-589, from Taylor & Francis, www.tandf.co.uk/] Evidence on microcephalic children (chuas) at the shrine, and how some of them developed a capacity for independent living. Internet publication URL: http://www.independentliving.org/miles201005.html
2006
Miles, M.  2006.  Children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus in Africa: can medical, family and community resources improve the life chances?
This much extended and revised article incorporates material from: M. Miles (2002) Children with hydrocephalus and spina bifida in East Africa: can family and community resources improve the odds? Disability & Society 17: 643-658, Carfax Publishing, Taylor & Francis. (The latter material is republished with permission.)  The revised article concerns social responses to children with hydrocephalus and spina bifida in African countries, and the historical development of ways in which various resources have been used to improve their life chances, and overcome the disabling effects of these conditions. Internet publication URLs: www.independentliving.org/docs7/miles200609.html and www.independentliving.org/docs7/miles200609.pdf (239 KB).
PDF icon miles200609.pdf (238.41 KB)
2002
Miles, M.  2002.  Community and Individual Responses to Disablement in South Asian Histories: Old Traditions, New Myths?
Documented histories of South Asian societies provide evidence that disabled people played various roles in their families and communities, sometimes with a good deal of independence. The commonest responses have been top-down, charitable or restrictive; yet some evidence challenges the stereotypes and suggests that disablement historically evoked a wider range of responses and initiative. Internet publication URL: www.independentliving.org/docs3/miles2002a.html